shayvaalski:

ariannagrandeofficial:

big-chicken:

cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat

this cat lives in a show horse barn which is why it walks and runs that way

to my utter delight translating the russian on this video gives us “In Barton Kuznetsova even cats trained dressage horse” and the heading says it’s a farm and her other video is of riders SO YES IT DOES APPEAR TO BE MIMIKING DRESSAGE HORSES

shayvaalski:

ariannagrandeofficial:

big-chicken:

cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat cat

this cat lives in a show horse barn which is why it walks and runs that way

to my utter delight translating the russian on this video gives us “In Barton Kuznetsova even cats trained dressage horse” and the heading says it’s a farm and her other video is of riders SO YES IT DOES APPEAR TO BE MIMIKING DRESSAGE HORSES

(via coffeeandsleeping)

Write to write. Write because you need to write. Write to settle the rage within you. Write with an internal purpose. Write about something or someone that means so much to you, that you don’t care what others think. — Nick Miller (via psych-facts)

(via thethinkingspot)

bpod-mrc:

31 August 2014
Lessons from Lizards
Lizards can lose their tails. The idea is that reptile-guzzling predators are distracted by the abandoned appendage while the lizard scarpers to safety. And then the lizard’s tail grows back. This ability to regenerate body parts has long interested scientists, who hope to mimic it in humans. As the most closely related animals to humans (who sometimes regrow lost fingertips) that can regenerate entire body parts we and lizards share the same toolbox of genes for the job. Researchers have now carried out the first genome analysis of tail regeneration in the green anole (pictured), which revealed that during tail regrowth lizards turn on 326 genes, including those involved in embryonic development, response to hormone signals and wound healing. By following the lizard’s genetic recipe for regeneration, then harnessing those genes in humans, it may be possible to regrow new cartilage, muscle or spinal cord in the future.
Written by Nick Kennedy
—
Image by Piccolo NamekOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 3.0)Research published in PLOS One, August 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

31 August 2014

Lessons from Lizards

Lizards can lose their tails. The idea is that reptile-guzzling predators are distracted by the abandoned appendage while the lizard scarpers to safety. And then the lizard’s tail grows back. This ability to regenerate body parts has long interested scientists, who hope to mimic it in humans. As the most closely related animals to humans (who sometimes regrow lost fingertips) that can regenerate entire body parts we and lizards share the same toolbox of genes for the job. Researchers have now carried out the first genome analysis of tail regeneration in the green anole (pictured), which revealed that during tail regrowth lizards turn on 326 genes, including those involved in embryonic development, response to hormone signals and wound healing. By following the lizard’s genetic recipe for regeneration, then harnessing those genes in humans, it may be possible to regrow new cartilage, muscle or spinal cord in the future.

Written by Nick Kennedy

Image by Piccolo Namek
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 3.0)
Research published in PLOS One, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

aseaofquotes:

Neil Gaiman, The Ocean at the End of the Lane

aseaofquotes:

Neil Gaiman, The Ocean at the End of the Lane

(via thethinkingspot)

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series.

cadarnle:

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what we have in the real world? I read fantasy to get away from politically correct cliches. 


God, yes! If there’s one thing fantasy is just crawling with these days it’s widowed black middle-aged pirate moms. 

Real sea pirates could not be controlled by women, they were vicous rapits and murderers and I am sorry to say it was a man’s world. It is unrealistic wish fulfilment for you and your readers to have so many female pirates, especially if you want to be politically correct about it!

First, I will pretend that your last sentence makes sense because it will save us all time. Second, now you’re pissing me off. 

You know what? Yeah, Zamira Drakasha, middle-aged pirate mother of two, is a wish-fulfillment fantasy. I realized this as she was evolving on the page, and you know what? I fucking embrace it. 

Why shouldn’t middle-aged mothers get a wish-fulfillment character, you sad little bigot? Everyone else does. H.L. Mencken once wrote that “Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.” I can’t think of anyone to whom that applies more than my own mom, and the mothers on my friends list, with the incredible demands on time and spirit they face in their efforts to raise their kids, preserve their families, and save their own identity/sanity into the bargain. 

Shit yes, Zamira Drakasha, leaping across the gap between burning ships with twin sabers in hand to kick in some fucking heads and sail off into the sunset with her toddlers in her arms and a hold full of plundered goods, is a wish-fulfillment fantasy from hell. I offer her up on a silver platter with a fucking bow on top; I hope she amuses and delights. In my fictional world, opportunities for butt-kicking do not cease merely because one isn’t a beautiful teenager or a muscle-wrapped font of testosterone. In my fictional universe, the main characters are a fat ugly guy and a skinny forgettable guy, with a supporting cast that includes “SBF, 41, nonsmoker, 2 children, buccaneer of no fixed abode, seeks unescorted merchant for light boarding, heavy plunder.”

You don’t like it? Don’t buy my books. Get your own fictional universe. Your cabbage-water vision of worldbuilding bores me to tears. 

As for the “man’s world” thing, religious sentiments and gender prejudices flow differently in this fictional world. Women are regarded as luckier, better sailors than men. It’s regarded as folly for a ship to put to sea without at least one female officer; there are several all-female naval military traditions dating back centuries, and Drakasha comes from one of them. As for claims to “realism,” your complaint is of a kind with those from bigoted hand-wringers who whine that women can’t possibly fly combat aircraft, command naval vessels, serve in infantry actions, work as firefighters, police officers, etc. despite the fact that they do all of those things— and are, for a certainty, doing them all somewhere at this very minute. Tell me that a fit fortyish woman with 25+ years of experience at sea and several decades of live bladefighting practice under her belt isn’t a threat when she runs across the deck toward you, and I’ll tell you something in return— you’re gonna die of stab wounds.

What you’re really complaining about isn’t the fact that my fiction violates some objective “reality,” but rather that it impinges upon your sad, dull little conception of how the world works. I’m not beholden to the confirmation of your prejudices; to be perfectly frank, the prospect of confining the female characters in my story to placid, helpless secondary places in the narrative is so goddamn boring that I would rather not write at all. I’m not writing history, I’m writing speculative fiction. Nobody’s going to force you to buy it. Conversely, you’re cracked if you think you can persuade me not to write about what amuses and excites me in deference to your vision, because your vision fucking sucks.

I do not expect to change your mind but i hope that you will at least consider that I and others will not be buying your work because of these issues. I have been reading science fiction and fantasy for years and i know that I speak for a great many people. I hope you might stop to think about the sales you will lose because you want to bring your political corectness and foul language into fantasy. if we wanted those things we could go to the movies. Think about this! 

Thank you for your sentiments. I offer you in exchange this engraved invitation to go piss up a hill, suitable for framing.

The ‘critic’ is apparently also unaware of Ching Shih or Grainne O’Malley. 

(via ngaio-w)

bennycreampuff:

They wouldn’t say “Father of two meets world leaders today”
They’d say “President Obama meets world leaders today”.
They wouldn’t say “Father of three founds one of the most successful modern computer businesses.”
They’d say “Bill Gates founds one of the most successful modern computer businesses.”
Get your shit right and use women’s names, not the number of kids they have.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Stop defining women by their breeding success and their relationship with men.

bennycreampuff:

They wouldn’t say “Father of two meets world leaders today”

They’d say “President Obama meets world leaders today”.

They wouldn’t say “Father of three founds one of the most successful modern computer businesses.”

They’d say “Bill Gates founds one of the most successful modern computer businesses.”

Get your shit right and use women’s names, not the number of kids they have.

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Stop defining women by their breeding success and their relationship with men.

(via ngaio-w)

ama-ar-gi:

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that.

 Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.

There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.

Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.

Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls. 

Sources: Mind of the Raven, Bernd Heinrich, The American Crow and the Common Raven, Lawrence Kilham 

(via hellastarboy)

The truth is that teen culture is not homogenous—and neither is fangirl culture. Teenagers are complicated and complex, and they behave differently in different contexts. The average teenager who goes to a Five Seconds of Summer concert and screams her head off is actually capable of writing an essay on the political situation in the Gaza Strip the next day. She’s capable of liking Taylor Swift and disliking heels, of deploying a Twitter hashtag or helping out a charity drive, of loving Twilight and hating Fifty Shades of Grey. She contains multitudes. bookshop, in the fantastic “The teens on Tumblr are all right,” The Kernel (via elizabethminkel)

(via dailydot)

thegirlwithgoldeyes:

thegirlwithgoldeyes:

She had curves in all the wrong places. She had a boob sticking out of her kneecap and I’d never seen an ass on the back of someone’s head before

She had legs that went on forever. And ever, and ever. Legs going on into the endless primordial void from which we all came from and to which we shall all return. Her toes touched infinity, her hips perched on the cessation of existence.

(via hellastarboy)

johanoosterman:

Black manuscripts - actually on parchment that was painted black - are amongst the rarest manuscripts we have. At the end of the fifteenth century at the court of Burgundy they were popular for a while. Well known is the black hours in the Morgan Library, but barely known is the black manuscript in Brussels (KB 9085) with dance melodies. On a black ground the notes were drawn in silver while the text was written in gold. Underneath the golden text, silvery letters indicate the dance steps.

johanoosterman:

Black manuscripts - actually on parchment that was painted black - are amongst the rarest manuscripts we have. At the end of the fifteenth century at the court of Burgundy they were popular for a while. Well known is the black hours in the Morgan Library, but barely known is the black manuscript in Brussels (KB 9085) with dance melodies. On a black ground the notes were drawn in silver while the text was written in gold. Underneath the golden text, silvery letters indicate the dance steps.

(via sexycodicology)